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In a signed letter to the Veterinary Medical Officer of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), dated January 12, 2023, the Acting Chief Veterinary Officer of the Ghanaian Veterinary Services Directorate of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture acknowledged receipt of the FSIS’ proposed certificate of export for pork and pork products, and confirmed its acceptance.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Kenya: Exporter Guide

Kenya’s consumer-oriented food imports increased 4.5 percent to $484 million in 2021. This growth was driven by a sound macroeconomic environment and a slight recovery from impacts associated with the Covid-19 pandemic. Best prospective products for export to Kenya include snack foods, sauces and condiments, distilled spirits, wine, beer, pet food, and tree nuts.
The Bank of Ghana restricted access to foreign exchange for a select list of imported products, including rice, poultry, vegetable oils, and pasta, among other items, to implement a directive from the President of Ghana.
This report documents Angola’s technical policies, practices, and import requirements for food and agricultural products. In the absence of a food safety law, Angola follows international Codex Alimentarius standards. This country report is designed to be used in conjunction with the 2022 FAIRS Export Certificate report.
This report documents Angola’s technical policies, practices, and import requirements for food and agricultural products. In the absence of a food safety law, Angola follows international Codex Alimentarius standards. This country report is designed to be used in conjunction with the 2022 FAIRS Export Certificate report.
This report lists major certificates and permits required to export food and agricultural products from the United States to Angola. It is recommended that this report be read with the FAIRS – Narrative Report for a comprehensive understanding of the Angola regulations, standards, and import requirements.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Ghana: Exporter Guide

Ghana’s economic growth was significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, with real GDP growth of only 0.4 percent. Following the pandemic-induced slowdown, economic recovery was expected to grow in 2022 to 5.5 percent. However, recent economic...
The 2022 FAIRS Annual Country Report provides up to date information on the regulations and procedures for the importation of food and agricultural products to Ghana. A Government of Ghana policy review in March 2022 has increased import duties of general goods, including food and agricultural products.
This report provides information on the certificates required for the importation of food and agricultural products into Ghana, plus further information on food product registration, labeling, import permits and other relevant information to assist U.S. exporters This report complements the FAIRS Annual Country Report for Ghana.
This report complements the FAIRS Annual Country Report for Kenya and provides information on certificates required by the Government of Kenya (GOK) to export food and agricultural products into the country. The Kenya Electronic Import Export System provides a single point for importers and exporters to electronically submit certificates and receive approvals from relevant trade regulatory agencies.
This report provides updates on Government of Kenya (GOK) import requirements and regulations for food and agricultural products. It includes applicable laws and guidelines, import procedures, and contact details of key trade regulatory and specialist agencies.
International Agricultural Trade Report

Opportunities for U.S. Feed Ingredients and Processed Products in Kenya

Kenya’s strategic geographical location and growing middle class makes it an economic, financial, and transport hub for East and Central Africa. Agriculture remains the main contributor to the economy with approximately 75 percent of the 54.7 million population working fully or partially in the agriculture sector. However, high fertilizer prices, small rain-fed fields, and low productivity are obstacles to increasing domestic supply while Kenya’s growing population, increasing urbanization, and growing incomes will spark higher demand for imported food.