Browse Data and Analysis

Filter

Search
In a signed letter to the Veterinary Medical Officer of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), dated January 12, 2023, the Acting Chief Veterinary Officer of the Ghanaian Veterinary Services Directorate of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture acknowledged receipt of the FSIS’ proposed certificate of export for pork and pork products, and confirmed its acceptance.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Kenya: Exporter Guide

Kenya’s consumer-oriented food imports increased 4.5 percent to $484 million in 2021. This growth was driven by a sound macroeconomic environment and a slight recovery from impacts associated with the Covid-19 pandemic. Best prospective products for export to Kenya include snack foods, sauces and condiments, distilled spirits, wine, beer, pet food, and tree nuts.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Kenya: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

On October 3, 2022, Kenya’s newly elected president, Dr. William Ruto, lifted the 10-year ban on importation and cultivation of genetically engineered (GE) agricultural products. This decision opens a path to importation of GE agricultural commodities and domestic production of GE crops in accordance with Kenya’s existing regulatory structure.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Ghana: Ghana's Economy Enters a New Era

Ghana has experienced a sudden economic downturn, a product of internal miscalculations and external shocks. Once ranked among the fastest growing economies in the world, Ghana has lost the steam that made it a shining example of a well-managed economy in Sub-Saharan Africa, and now finds itself in economic turmoil.
Nigeria has taken an increasingly active role in biotechnology research and development in Africa – spurred by the solid support of the Government of Nigeria (GON). In September 2022, Nigeria hosted regulators from Mozambique and Ethiopia to learn more about Nigeria’s biotechnology regulatory experience.
The Bank of Ghana restricted access to foreign exchange for a select list of imported products, including rice, poultry, vegetable oils, and pasta, among other items, to implement a directive from the President of Ghana.
This report documents Angola’s technical policies, practices, and import requirements for food and agricultural products. In the absence of a food safety law, Angola follows international Codex Alimentarius standards. This country report is designed to be used in conjunction with the 2022 FAIRS Export Certificate report.
This report documents Angola’s technical policies, practices, and import requirements for food and agricultural products. In the absence of a food safety law, Angola follows international Codex Alimentarius standards. This country report is designed to be used in conjunction with the 2022 FAIRS Export Certificate report.
This report lists major certificates and permits required to export food and agricultural products from the United States to Angola. It is recommended that this report be read with the FAIRS – Narrative Report for a comprehensive understanding of the Angola regulations, standards, and import requirements.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Ghana: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Ghana’s National Biosafety Authority has eventually given the green light for the environmental release and placement on the market of the pod borer resistant (PBR) or Bt. Cowpea.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Angola: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Angola currently does not allow the use of agricultural biotechnology in production, and imports containing genetically engineered (GE) components are limited to food aid. In December 2004, the Council of Ministers approved Decree No. 92/04 restricting the use of biotechnology in Angola as a provisional measure pending the establishment of a comprehensive National Biosafety System capable of properly controlling the importation, entry, use, and eventual production of GE organisms in the country.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Ghana: Ghana Oilseeds Voluntary 2022

Marketing year (MY) 2022/23 palm kernel production is forecast at 62,000 metric tons (MT), down by about nine percent compared to Post’s MY2021/22 projection. This is mainly because of an annual three-month drought period (December-February) that negatively affects FFB yield, and consequently kernel yield.