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Attaché Report (GAIN)

Turkey: Turkey Updates List of Approved Biotech Events

On December 30, 2022, the Turkish Government published a Biosafety Decision to reapprove the import of a genetically engineered (GE) stacked corn event, NK603 X MON 810, for feed. In a separate government action, the single event MON 810 was canceled due to a recent court decision. With these latest changes, the total number of approved GE events remains at 36.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

United Kingdom: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Since January 1, 2021, the UK has been responsible for authorizing products of genetic engineering (GE) using retained EU law. Eight GE crops are currently out for public consultation as part of the second tranche of approvals under the new UK...
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Poland: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Poland opposes the use of genetic engineering in agriculture. Although the current regulatory framework technically allows genetically engineered (GE) seeds to enter commerce, the law stipulates they cannot be planted.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Czech Republic: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

There are no significant changes to the agricultural biotechnology situation in the Czech Republic in 2022. The country generally maintains a scientific approach towards biotechnology. Czech farmers planted genetically engineered (GE) corn from 2005 to 2017.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

France: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

The French livestock industry depends on imported genetically engineered (GE) feed, especially soybean, rapeseed, and corn. However, France has no commercial production or field trials of GE crops. While most French scientists and farmers are generally supportive of biotechnology, consumer attitudes toward GE are primarily negative.
The European Union’s (EU) complex and lengthy policy framework for biotechnology creates a challenging environment for research and limits access to innovative tools for EU farmers.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Netherlands: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

This report assesses the agricultural biotechnology sector in the Netherlands, and covers related production, trade, and policies. It includes topics related to genetic engineering and innovative plant, animal, and microbial biotechnologies.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Bulgaria: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

The Government of Bulgaria (GOB) continues to oppose agricultural biotechnology and supports anti-biotech policy initiatives within the European Commission (EC). Non-governmental anti-biotech organizations, local activists, and Bulgaria’s organics industry actively spread nonscientific disinformation about biotechnology.
The biotechnology regulatory system in Ukraine is still not fully developed, but the country is gradually adjusting its domestic policies to align with the European Union’s regulations. Agricultural biotechnology is a disputed item in Ukraine. Currently, no GE events are officially approved for agricultural and food production.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Turkey: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Turkey published its Biosafety Law and implementing regulations in 2010. This legislation has continued to disrupt trade and Turkey’s domestic agriculture and food sectors. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry is the sole authority for biotechnology approvals. The Ministry approved seven genetically engineered soybean and corn events in 2022.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Austria: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

This report includes information on the status of plant, animal, and microbial biotechnology in Austria. The nation continues to be one of the leading forces in Europe opposed to the use of agricultural biotechnology.
Attaché Report (GAIN)

Bosnia and Herzegovina: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) allows permitted import of genetically engineered (GE) products based on the 2009 “Law on Genetically Modified Organisms” (“GMOs”) and its pertaining bylaws. To date, the first and only GE product approved for import is GE soybean meal for feed. BiH’s anti-GE border practices, which include random testing, can occasionally influence commercial imports of grains.